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Hudson Valley Seed Company (select one - assorted seed packs)

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Assorted Seed Packs $3.95 each. See below for details on each seed variety. 

 

ABUNDANT BLOOMSDALE SPINACH (100 Seeds)

An improved savoyed spinach that boasts cold tolerance and high yields. Best as an early spring crop or for fall harvests. Abundant Bloomsdale produces large, super-savoyed, substantial leaves. Grow as a mature spinach plant. Named after the Abundant Life Seed Foundation Farm, where this variety started in 2002.

This product, though Certified Organic in the United States, is not certified to Canadian Organic standards.

Direct sow any time soil can be worked in the cooler months, from about 6 weeks before first fall frost until the date of your last spring frost. Broadcast seeds in a well cultivated garden patch, or seed in rows 10" apart, and thin seedlings to 6". Spinach sown in fall will come up extremely early in the spring. When full size, harvest the entire plant promptly, especially in late spring, when it tends to bolt under heat pressure. Sow in successions for a steady crop. For a good fall crop, sow spinach in August. Fall crops yield until deep winter; with a cold frame, you can eat spinach all winter long.

 

ALL STARS KALE (100 Seeds)

Direct sow kale about a month before last frost. Alternatively, sow under protection 8 weeks earlier, then transplant about a month before last frost. For a young, tender fall crop, sow 3-4 months before first fall frost. Avoid planting at edge of garden, as slugs love kale and will creep in for nightly dining. Harvest a handful of individual outer leaves from each plant; mature plants will be ready for another harvest in a few days.

The flavor of this kale similar to other Russian kales, a bit sharper than Dino Kale or Vates Blue Curled Kale. Plant this variety if you enjoy the flavor of Asian greens, but long for something more substantial and longer lasting in the garden. Makes a great baby leaf for salads. It's also a great variety for the budding breeder or seed saver. Kale is a biennial; grow the plants in year one, overwinter the ones you like, and save the seeds in the second year.

 

BASIL BOUQUET (250 Seeds)

The diversity of basil is a good example of how food culture has influenced backyard plant breeding. Pesto is a regional dish from Genoa, Italy. Genovese gardeners selected basil for the qualities they felt made the best pesto–especially the ability to pestare, or to pound, the leaves. Thai basils, on the other hand, were bred for their strong, rich aromas that did not diminish during stir-frying. Find a purpose for every basil in this mix, which includes Lemon, Lime, Corsican and Genovese Basil. 

Direct sow after frost, or start indoors up to 1 month before last frost date. To have fresh basil the whole season, start in succession at 1-month intervals. Pinch off tallest growth in order to keep basil from flowering; flavor becomes too strong once in bloom. Good for garden or container plantings.

 

BORAGE (100 Seeds)

One of the most popular edible flowers, borage's star-shaped blossoms have a pleasant cucumber-like flavor. The gray-green foliage is festooned with small, bright flowers, which can be used to decorate cakes, salads, and drinks. It also has medicinal properties and attracts beneficial insects.

Direct sow after frost. Or, start indoors 2-3 weeks early and transplant promptly after the last frost. Takes 7-14 days to germinate. Grows 18-24" tall.

 

BUMBLEBEE MIX CHERRY TOMATO

Contains Purple Bumble Bee, Sunrise Bumble Bee, and Pink Bumble Bee cherry tomatoes. Grow a few plants this year and you'll find yourself buzzing like a bee to each.

Start seeds indoors 6-8 weeks before last frost, then transplant outdoors to indicated spacing after all threat of frost has passed. All tomatoes benefit from staking; indeterminate varieties require it. Prune tomatoes when they reach about 24" high and are starting to produce small suckers. Keep plants from coming into contact with the soil, and water at the roots to prevent the spread of soil borne disease.

 

CHIVES (200 Seeds)

The smallest of all the Alliums, chives are considered by some to be the only species of Allium native to both the Old World and the New. The sulfur smell of the plant is said to repel garden insect pests while the flowers attract beneficial pollinators. This clumping onion survives winter in the Northeast and often blooms in early May. The green shoots are the first to come up in the spring, and can be used in warm winter tonic to ward off cool days. Be sure to let your chives flower though; they are a wonderful, oniony edible flower.

Chives are easy to grow and thrive in a number of garden places, including borders and containers. Start seeds indoors, about a week before outdoor soils can be worked. Keep watered but not wet. Transplant outdoors in clumps when chives are about 3" and the soil can be worked. Alternatively, direct sow outdoors in a weed free area as soon as soil can be worked. Chives will grow slowly at first, but are extremely hearty and fast growing once established. For best culinary quality, cut chives every week or two once they are established. The chive flowers are also edible when they are soft and pink.

 

CURLED PARSLEY 200 Seeds) 

Looking closely, slowly, and quietly—in this hyper-connected age, the skill of meditative observation is a lost art. But, ironically, it is a practice that can lead us into deeper connection with the world. A study of this parsley reveals it to be exceptionally curly, with fold upon fold of dense foliage that makes for deliciously textured eating. Let it connect you to memories of your favorite tabouleh, to rich vegetable stew, even to buffets adorned with parsley garnish. Every garden is a window; take the time to look.

Parsley is an essential kitchen herb. This uber-curly variety should be more than a garnish. It packs intense flavor within all those curls. Its upright leaves stay off the ground, making it easier and cleaner to pick.

Start indoors early and transplant, or direct sow as soon as the ground can be worked. Parsley can take up to 2 weeks to germinate, so be patient and keep area watered. Thin to 12" apart for bushier plants. Harvest continually by cutting off the outer stems, leaving the middle leaves to grow. One planting can last all season, but it can also be sown in early summer for a fresh fall-winter crop.

 

DINO KALE (100 Seeds)

While it isn't quite as cold hardy as its kale cousins, it usually survives most of the winter under a blanket of row cover and snow. The seed we sourced for this particular kale variety was selected after trialing several other sources, and we chose it for it hardiness, vigor, and broad leaves.

Use mature leaves in salads if marinated in an acidic dressing. The flavor is great in pasta dishes, or alone with garlic and olive oil.

Direct sow Dino Kale about a month before last frost. Or, sow under protection 8 weeks earlier, then transplant about a month before last frost. For a young, tender fall crop, sow 3-4 months before first fall frost. Avoid planting at edge of garden, as slugs love kale and will creep in for nightly dining. Harvest a handful of individual outer leaves from each plant; mature plants will be ready for another harvest in a few days.

 

FOX CHERRY TOMATO (25 Seeds)

Fox Cherry Tomatoes grow on big, rangey vines. Unlike most cherry tomatoes, the fruits are large enough to use as regular tomatoes. They can be sliced into small rounds, or quartered, or chomped whole. Cherry tomatoes are more disease-resistant than standard varieties, and this is a particularly hardy, productive choice.

 

Indeterminate. Sow indoors 3-8 weeks before last frost, then transplant after frost into good garden soil. Provide support for these tall, rangey vines. Prune after they've been in the ground for 3-4 weeks to decrease soil-foliage contact, increase air flow around leaves, and establish sturdy structure.

 

GLORIOUS GLEAM NASTURTIUM (25 Seeds)

n the 18th Century, during his massive botanical naming project, Carl Linnaeus learned that his daughter, Elizabeth, saw flashing when she looked at nasturtium flowers in the evening. Scientists of the day theorized about electricity, phosphorescence, and the paranormal. Linnaeus was content to dub it “The Elizabeth Linnaeus Phenomenon” and leave it at that. You, too, can observe it: it’s an optical illusion caused by the interaction of green and orange in the pale light of dusk.

 

Direct sow after danger of frost has passed, spacing them closer together for a ground cover, or further apart if planting them among other annuals. Can also be sown in containers at indicated spacing. Plants are low lying, but spread wide, covering about 2 feet. All parts of the plant are edible and peppery: leaves, flowers and immature seeds. Use flowers immediately after harvest.

 

HOMEMADE CUCUMBER PICKLES (50 Seeds)

Love pickles but think they’re too much trouble? Not ready to take on canning? These prolific cukes have the perfect thick skin and crunchy toothsomeness that makes for the perfect pickle. Grow them and then follow Margaret Roach’s easy Refrigerator Pickles recipe. All that’s required is water, vinegar, salt, some spice, and some fresh homegrown cucumbers harvested when they are still young. On her blog, A Way to Garden, Margaret writes, “I think of these unprocessed pickles as a seasonal treat… a real rite of the harvest season.” Interested? Find a link to the recipe on our website.

Performs best when direct sown 4" apart soon after last frost and protected from cucumber beetles with row cover. Thin to indicated spacing once seedlings put on their first true leaves. Row cover can be removed once plants start to push against it. Plant in moderately fertile soil and water regularly. Cucumbers can be trellised or allowed to grow on the ground. Harvest when cucumbers are green and white and the skin begins to smoothen, but before they become shiny and yellow.

 

METTA LETTUCE MIX (250 Seeds)

In the Pali language of ancient Buddhism, “Metta” is the word for loving-kindness, the attribute of benevolence and good will felt toward others. In our neck of the woods, “Metta” evokes the name of our road and the nearby hamlet: Mettacahonts, a word likely of Mahican origin that means “tree-shaded creek.” So, we named this lovely lettuce mix “Metta” to express our love for it, to embody the good will of sharing seeds, and to help our customers feel connected to our little seed farm in this beautiful corner of the world.

Contains Flashy Butter Oak, Rouge d'Hiver, Buttercrunch Bibb, Tango, and Hyper-Red Rumpled Wave lettuces. 

Sow indoors beginning 8-10 weeks before last frost, or direct sow beginning about 4 weeks before last frost. Harvest late spring and summer sowings promptly to beat bolting. Succession sow 2-3 weeks apart until about 2 weeks before first fall frost. Cut each seeding 2-3 times before moving on to the next. You can also thin and allow plants to produce mature heads. Lettuce likes steady (but not excessive) moisture and can become prematurely bitter during dry spells; keep irrigated for best-tasting leaves.

 

MINT (500 Seeds)

Possessing one of the most potent and recognized aromas in the plant kingdom, mint is a truly magical plant. When grown from seed, it delivers a magical surprise: each plant is slightly different in appearance and flavor profile. In an age like ours when we can control our conditions more than any humans in history, inviting uncertainty into our gardens gives us a chance to let go and find gratitude for whatever manifests—especially when we trust that whatever manifests is going to be delicious.

Surface sow seeds indoors and gently press them in. Keep moist and at room temperature. Transplant outside when seedlings are at leat 3-4" tall, choosing location carefully, as mint spreads rapidly. Constructing barriers to restrict its growth or growing in containers, as well as regular harvesting, is helpful to control spread.

 

PAUL ROBESON TOMATO (25 Seeds)

A "black" type tomato with a distinctive smoky and sweet flavor, this heirloom consistently wins taste tests. 6-12 oz. fruits with dark green shoulders.

Start seeds indoors early, about 10 weeks before last frost. Seeds germinate best at 80 degrees F. Do not over water, and keep temperature warm but not hot to prevent damping off. Transplant outdoors after threat of frost has passed. Provide with proper support. A bit of pruning increases yield of fruit. Do not over water, and water at the base of the plant if possible to help reduce occurrence of disease. Harvest when the main body of the fruit is firm and red-brown, but has a slight give when squeezed. The shoulders of this variety may remain green and hard even when ripe.

 

PIRACICABA BROCCOLI (100 Seeds)

Piracicaba does not win prizes for the size of its main stalk, which is on the compact size. But it certainly takes the cake for its productivity and flavor of its florets, which it yields in great abundance all season long. Its habit is looser than regular broccoli, so much so that many people mistakenly identify it as raab or broccolini. It's sweeter than both, and freshly cut florets steam more quickly than the regular varieties, so be careful not to overcook.

Start indoors 6-8 weeks before last frost, then transplant around last frost. Plant in good soil in full sun to partial shade. Plants will grow to 30" high. Ready for harvest when beads of initial shoots are about 1 mm in size. Continue cutting shoots all season long; don't miss more than a couple of days. Plant again 12-14 weeks before first fall frost for a terrific autumn treat.

 

SACRED BASIL (250 Seeds)

Tulsi, considered a sacred plant in the Hindu religion, has been cultivated for at least 3,000 years. Known as the “Incomparable One,” “Queen of the Herbs,” and “Elixir of Life,” the scent, as well as preparations of the herb, have been used to heal for centuries. Today’s plant scientists classify Sacred Basil as an “adaptogen”—a substance that helps us adapt mentally and physically to stressful circumstances. One whiff of its exquisite aroma and you’ll understand why.

Start seeds indoors 6 weeks before last frost and transplant when plants have 2 sets of true leaves after threat of frost has passed. Can also be direct sown outdoors after last frost and thinned to indicated spacing. Basil requires moderate fertility and water. Harvest when plants are bushy, before flowers form by cutting the stems above smaller, leafy growth. Tulsi basil can be dried immediately after harvesting and kept for months. Self-sows.

 

SALAD SAVOR (500 Seeds)

Lettuce is rarely enough to carry a salad; it’s usually the other greens that take center stage, adding the kick and spice that are so important to a flavorful mouthful. That's where Salad Savor comes in. A lettuce-free mix chosen for flavor and texture, Salad Savor will be your go-to greens for their tangy taste, deep green color, and excellent nutrition. Combine baby leaves with baby lettuce for a delightful spring mix, eat alone in summer for pungent salads, or sauté full-grown plants in fall—or anytime!

Includes Arugula, Baby Boy Choy, Red Streaks Mizuna Tokyo Bekana, Yukon Savoy

Sow outdoors as soon as soil can be worked in spring until 3 weeks before first fall frost. Sow in succession at 3-week intervals for a continued harvest. For baby leaves: space seeds 1-2" apart and harvest when 3-4" high, about 1" above soil. Cut and come again for 2-3 harvests. Eat this mix as salad, sauté lightly, or add some baby leaf lettuce for a delightful mesclun mix.

 

SHANGHAI GREEN BABY BOK CHOY (200 Seeds)

Baby bok choy is one of the most versatile crops of the garden. It grows exceptionally quickly; it tolerates both cold and heat; it can be sown in succession for crops nearly all season long. It is also strikingly beautiful—its swooping, vase-shaped base is a whorl of thick green petioles that soften into sweet, ambrosial flesh when cooked. Enjoy them all season: infant choys herald the start of spring; thick-petioled bunches grill beautifully in mid-summer; and toddler boks perk up in the chill of fall.

Direct sow 4 weeks before last frost, or sow under protection 8-10 weeks before last frost; continue through August. Will form baby heads at 6" spacing, but if given 12-24" you'll get much larger plants. Harvest by cutting the entire head at the base. Requires ample water and fertile soil. Spring crop will bolt; harvest promptly! Fall crop will not; harvest at your own pace.

 

TINY TIM TOMATO (25 Seeds)

Tomatoes are all about tall tales—the biggest, heaviest, sweetest, earliest. But many of our most beloved literary figures are itty-bitty. This tomato would be at home in the tales of Tom Thumb, the Borrowers, Stewart Little, and Mighty Mouse. It caters to refined tastes and confined spaces. These miniature plants with tiny tomatoes deliver all the bravado of a full-size slicer in small but explosive sweet-tart bites.

Happiest in containers, Tiny Tim produces copious quantities of cherry-sized sweet-tart-tangy fruits on compact little plants. The tiny 1" red tomatoes are ready early and excel in sunny window boxes, picnic table centerpieces, and pots on city stoops.

Dwarfing habit. Sow indoors 3-8 weeks before last frost, then transplant after last frost. Tiny Tim is a container variety; it will struggle if planted directly in the earth. Be sure to plant in well-composted potting medium.

 

WALTHAM BUTTERNUT SQUASH (25 Seeds)

No garden crop soothes the soul like butternut squash. Its smooth, sweet, and nutty flesh entices as it bakes in the oven. For this hallmark experience of autumn we are indebted to insurance-man-turned-farmer Charles Leggett, who developed the Waltham Butternut variety in Massachusetts during the mid-1940s. Leggett combined the dense, easy-to-peel flesh of old “gooseneck” types with the flavor and texture of the best eating squashes. The result? Pure comfort food, straight from the garden.

Waltham is also one of the best keepers: if well cured and kept somewhere cool and dry, your butternuts will keep their eating quality well into spring.

Direct sow after frost, or start indoors 2-3 weeks earlier. Transplant in hills spaced 6' apart, 3 plants per hill, or in rows 36" apart. Plants can grow 6' or more, so give plenty of space to take over. Keep watered for the first couple weeks, and then—in most years—you can forget about them until October. Be sure to harvest before frost: once nipped, the fruits develop soft spots and quickly spoil in storage. Harvest when squash are buff-colored with no trace of green. Cure somewhere warm and dry for a week, then store in a cool, dry, dark place.